Welcome to InsuranceForums.info!   

Advertisments:


Sponsor Links

Affordable Pet Insurance
Travel Insurance Comparison


Why Has This Recessive Trait (aa) Not Changed Over Time?

Discussion forum for Insurance Agents

Why Has This Recessive Trait (aa) Not Changed Over Time?

Postby Lanzo » Sun Sep 17, 2017 2:15 pm

A large population of laboratory animals has been allowed to breed randomly for a number of generations. After several generations, 25% of the animals display a recessive trait (aa), the same percentage as at the beginning of the breeding program. The rest of the animals show the dominant phenotype, with heterozygotes indistinguishable from the homozygous dominants.

What is the most reasonable conclusion that can be drawn from the fact that the frequency of the recessive trait (aa) has not changed over time?

A) The genotype AA is lethal.

B) The two phenotypes are about equally adaptive under laboratory conditions.

C)There has been sexual selection favoring allele a.

D)The population is undergoing genetic drift.

E)There has been a high rate of mutation of allele A to allele a.
Lanzo
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2014 9:12 am

Why Has This Recessive Trait (aa) Not Changed Over Time?

Postby Ofer » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:06 pm

there's a 25% possibility that the newborn does not be waiting to roll his tongue. hence, if that newborn have been to have his very own newborn with the daughter of two heterozygous father and mom, the possibility of their infants could stay 25% for the subsequent technology.
Ofer
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 6:12 pm

Why Has This Recessive Trait (aa) Not Changed Over Time?

Postby Ferghus » Tue Oct 10, 2017 2:43 pm

B) The two phenotypes are about equally adaptive under laboratory conditions.

==

I think the desired idea here is that the population is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.
Messrs. Hardy and Weinberg came up with the idea that allele frequencies in a population don't change unless something happens to make them change (which is why I call them "the Captains Obvious"). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardy%E2%80...

Something interesting about this question though, is that there's an implication that the lab population was in this equilibrium from the get-go.
The collector may have picked animals completely at random from a wild population that was at H-W equilibrium.
Ferghus
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Mon Jan 06, 2014 11:39 pm


Return to Insurance Agents

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post