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Does Anyone Here Own A Pig As A Pet? If So, What Kind And What Can You Tell Me About Them?

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Does Anyone Here Own A Pig As A Pet? If So, What Kind And What Can You Tell Me About Them?

Postby kangee88 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 11:08 pm

darwin? said: 3 My aunt had a pet Poland China sow. She got along beautifully with the dogs and in fact used to lead the pack when they went out raiding garbage cans(the neighbors used to complain that her "big red dog" was at the trash again - they just couldn't bring themselves to believe it was a pig). She loved to jump on the couch to get her ears scratched(unfortunately as a full adult she weighed 600 pounds and broke the couch), and loved to paddle in the pool with the kids and the chocolate lab. She was very smart, totally house-trained, very protective(she patrolled the yard frequently, running off stray dogs, miscellaneous cats, and any squirrel that dared show its bushy tail), and got along with the family cats, all the dogs, and the horses.I think most folks would recommend a breed that will stay relatively small, say up to 100 pounds. After all, it is really hard to get a 600 pound pig to go to the vet if it doesn't want to go. 67 months ago
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Does Anyone Here Own A Pig As A Pet? If So, What Kind And What Can You Tell Me About Them?

Postby Hiamovi » Fri Apr 04, 2014 7:21 am

once upon a time, There was a pig named Wilbur. Boy, was he a cute Vietnamese Pot-Bellied Pig. He was pretty small when we got him.  Maybe10 lbs. or so.  He lived outside though, in a pen with our calves, and ate scraps and high moisture corn.    He was smart for an animal.  Just as smart as a dog.  Pigs can be leash-trained, potty trained(to go outside).   Pigs are  very clean, they like to have their living area free of debris and "waste".  Vietnamese pot bellied pigs can get very big if you overfeed them. I mean, like 400 lbs BIG.  They like dog food and cat food.  Just about anything that humans like actually.   I think that pigs get along very well with dogs.  They are a lot lower to the ground and you have to take that into consideration with your furniture(maybe that would be a good thing-they wouldn?t jump up on the couch as much as dogs). I think that they would be a dream as far as grooming, or the lack thereof.   This pig looks amazingly like my pig, Wilbur:   Did I mention that his sister and mother eventually came to stay with us also?  Wilbur didn?t get into the 400 lb. range but he was pretty big. I think that he had a stroke because one morning he couldn?t get up, and then died shortly after.  I miss Wilbur.   They were not as friendly as Wilbur, but mainly they liked to hang out together. Pigs are social creatures. Pigs like company and like to be scratched.  When I?d go to scratch Wilbur?s belly he would fall over on his side to allow me better access. His teeth scared me a bit, you can just see and hear the jaw strength of pig when you witness them eating. I believe that the vet can tell you or help you with the teeth issue cause Wilbur?s teeth got really long  and needed to be trimmed.   I don?t know much about anything pig-wise besides having Wilbur and raising pigs for butchering, so I can?t tell you anything about breeds.  You might want to talk to some breeders, after you make sure that you are able to keep a pig(zoning laws, some places may consider them livestock) and make sure that your vet will handle pigs. They are alot different than dogs and cats and just because they are a vet I don?t think they?ll automatically take on a pig as a patient. I?m sure that you will have to get the pig neutered or spayed, if you decide to get one.   Here is a very important website with information that you should read, it?s written by a group that takes in pigs.http://www.thepigpreserveassociation.org/miniature_pig_faqs.htm   good luck in your porcine endeavors!                                     Oh, and another note of warning. If you don't like your flowerbeds dug up, I would recommend keeping that pig on a leash or far away from them!  Pigs like to dig.  And they run EXTREEEEEEEEMELY fast! Sources: personal exp/google images   truff's Recommendations Pot-Bellied Pigs As a Family Pet Amazon List Price: $35.95 Used from: $2.23 Average Customer Rating: 3.0 out of 5(based on 1 reviews) Pot-Bellied Pigs: A Complete Authoritative Guide Amazon List Price: $19.95 Used from: $7.99 Average Customer Rating: 5.0 out of 5(based on 1 reviews) Pot Bellied Pigs and Other Miniature Pet Pigs Amazon List Price: $23.95 Used from: $0.43 Average Customer Rating: 4.0 out of 5(based on 4 reviews) Pot-Bellied Pet Pigs: Mini-Pig Care and Training Amazon List Price: $9.95 Used from: $0.01 Average Customer Rating: 5.0 out of 5(based on 1 reviews) Potbellied Pig Behavior And Training Amazon List Price: $29.95 Used from: $29.95 Average Customer Rating: 5.0 out of 5(based on 10 reviews) Wow! look at all these books! a plethora of information! truff 67 months ago Please sign in to give a compliment. Please verify your account to give a compliment. Please sign in to send a message. Please verify your account to send a message.
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